Build organically, but leverage intentionally

In the beginning of the process, you’re just trying things. 

Raising your hand. Saying yes to opportunities that present themselves. Embracing a brimming universe of naturally rising tides. And over time, once you find out what really works for you, then you lock in. You shift from an emergent strategy to a deliberate one. 

Several years ago, I published a book about the profitability of approachability

To my delight, it was positively reviewed by a popular job search website. Which wasn’t exactly my target readership, but the economy was in the toilet and people were looking for any advantage they could get. So it turned out to be a perfect fit. 

In fact, the audience response to the book was so positive, that the organization asked if would start contributing a regular column to their newsletter. Articles about how job seekers could become more hireable. And I remember thinking to myself, hireable, now there’s an interesting word. Maybe that’s a different slant on something I’m already doing. Maybe this concept represents a new market opportunity for my work. Maybe saying yes to this project will broaden my appeal as a thought leader. 

And so, I locked in. I began playing in the job search space more purposefully. What began as an organic, emergent strategy and shifted into an intentional, deliberate strategy. And in a few years, as I found my center of gravity, it became a lucrative pursuit. 

Are you allowing yourself the freedom of discovering before bearing down into the labor of creating?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and ava

The Nametag Guy Live: Making the Market Target You

I recently delivered the closing keynote address at the BeautiControl 2014 Annual Sales Conference. 

I spoke to 3,500 beauty consultants in Dallas, Texas.

This particular clip tells the story about my business model. About contributing enough good in the world that the market targets you.

Are you the arrow or the bullseye?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


I want to feel like I’m part of a continuum

When you work for yourself, the
pile never gets down to zero. 

There’s always something else to be done. There’s
always more work waiting. Even after grinding it out for sixteen hours a day,
seven days a week, you still might not put a dent in the pile. 

Work units just keep
popping up like some kind of twisted, neverending game of whac a mole. 

It
can feel profoundly frustrating and mystifying. You think to yourself, Iclimbed
all these mountains, and now there’s another one? 



What. The. Hell. 

Unfortunately, this experience is written into the
entrepreneurial job description. It comes with the territory of hiring
yourself. And learning to live with the uncertainty of it is part of becoming a
complete artist. 

But as my mentor once said,the futility of everything
is fertile ground. 

That’s why you learn to make peace with the pile. To
love the pile. To accept work for the infinite regression that it is. And just do
your best, every day, to move your story forward. 

Because art is a long arc
game. There is no finish line. There is no expiration date on the imagination.
Everything we create isa constantly evolving organism within the
ecosystem of our larger body of work. Everything we do is assigned its
appropriate home on the artistic continuum. And everything we become
contributes to our story as an individual. 

Once we embrace that reality, once
we surrender to the absurdity of this neverending pile, the thing we call work
becomes much easier to process. 

What futilities
have you come to terms with?


* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Moments of Conception 127 — The Dream Scene from Inception

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today’s clip comes from the dream scene in Inception:

What can we learn?



There are no rules if something is great. Ariadne is an architecture student recruited to construct the various dreamscapes. With her help, the team will be able infiltrate the target’s subconscious and extract the necessary information. Naturally, she can’t resist. There’s nothing quite like it. It’s pure creation. In the dream state, reality is negotiable. All rules can be bent or broken. She can even cheat architecture into impossible shapes. But this is a movie. Real people can’t access that kind of creative power in their own lives. Until we can. It’s simply a matter of giving ourselves permission. Realizing that, in art, we can do whatever we want. The only thing that stops us is our stubborn need to categorize. Our habit of addictively defining ourselves in narrow ways. But if we truly our creativity to expand into unexpected territory, we have to engage in possibility for its own sake. If a blues singer, for example, wants to cross genres and record a country album, she absolutely can. Nobody is going to stop her. But until she sheds the outdated way of speaking about her identity, until she accepts the story that it’s okay for someone like her to cross musical boundaries, then her music will never see the light of day. A useful mantra to remember is, no labels, no limits. If we decide exactly what we’re doing, then we can only be as good as that. But if we remake ourselves as we grow and as the world changes, keeping our creative process in permanent beta, anything is possible. Just like the dreamscape, there’s nothing between us and raw, direct, pure creation. What kinds of permissions do you give yourself?



First you write the book, then the book writes you. Ariadne has been to the top of the mountain. She seen the promised land, and knows she will forever be changed. Einstein was right, a mind once stretched by new thoughts can never regain its original shape. That’s the great transformation of art. How your life changes once the work is done. Because once you’ve shipped, once something is yours, once you have your own art in your own hands, you’re never the same again. I remember receiving the very first copy of my very first book. That moment is permanently seared into my memory. Something about the act of tearing open the box, inhaling the acidic scent of victory and beholding my own creation in my hands, changed me forever. I slept with the book that night. Because I knew my life would regain its original shape. And I was right. First the you write the book, then the book writes you. And so, there is no failure in art. Simply by virtue of engaging in the creative process, we gain something that nobody can take away from us. The person we become by creating it, and the life we’re able lead by having created it. How do you let experiences change you?



A skewed relationship to reality. We’re all searching for some dream to pour ourselves into. Our one big idea that’s as large and as great as we are. A productive obsession that we can nurture and see to fruition. Of course, every creation has a cost. Not a price, necessarily, but a cost. To us and the people around us. Cobb warns his young apprentice never to recreate from her own memory, but to always create new places. Otherwise she’ll lose grasp on what’s real and what’s a dream. That’s why she needs a totem. Some kind of personal icon. A small object that you can always have with her, the weight and movement of which nobody else knows, to convince her beyond a doubt that she’s not in someone else’s dream. What’s interesting is, the term totem actually derives from the word for “sibling kin, group or family.” Meaning, your totem doesn’t necessarily have to be an object. It can be a person, too. Someone who refuses to bullshit you. Someone who sees what you can’t see for yourself. Someone who has the courage to tell you that you’ve been following your obsession for too long, and you’ve become a slave to it. Who in your life is willing to say when you’ve gone too far? 

What did you learn?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Tunnel of Love — Chapter 5: Loss, Theft, Damage (2014) — Scott Ginsberg Concert Documentary

Tunnel of Love is a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity. Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, Ginsberg’s film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.

Watch the trailer. Meet the creators. Go behind the scenes. See the episode schedule. Download the discussion guide.

www.tunneloflovedoc.com

Tunnel of Love will be presented as a serialized, episodic documentary. The movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, so I’m premiering each song as a stand alone chapter. There are 14 songs in the concert, so the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks, from September to December 2014.

Here’s chapter five:

LOSS, THEFT, DAMAGE

I got my coverage for theft and loss
Damage and mysterious
Under the cloak, of this night
We see what we can afford to see

It’s better to bury
Than expose

We all sling arrows, from quivers soft
Hiding inside a crimson cloth
Strike a blow, for the forces of light
And the various etceteras

The naked, the terror
Of regret

We don’t have to take the world as it is
All we are are crickets and wind
Seems like such a tender labor, and it is
Where love ends, pickets, and begins

We remember the past
The way we need to

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Moments of Conception 126 — The Breakfast Scene from Pee Wee’s Big Adventure

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today’s clip comes from the breakfast scene in Pee Wee’s Big Adventure:

What can we learn?



You need a better routine, not more time. Peewee was an inspiration to me. He was a guy who
laughed all the time, wore the same clothes every day, decorated his home with
outlandish decorations and obscure furniture and he surrounded himself with
strange contraptions and inventions that were deliberately over engineered to
perform simple tasks in a complicated fashion. To call his home a playhouse was
the understatement of the decade. God
bless him
. However, as an adult, I’ve come to appreciate his character on a
more intellectual level. Peewee’s house, for example, is much more than just a Rube Goldberg machine. It’s a commitment to a routine. It’s a lifestyle. It’s a user
interface for his brain. He knows that something is lost when he fails to start
his day consciously. That’s why he executes a perfectly calibrated sequence for
the first hour of his morning. It ensures that his day has a cadence and a
rhythm. It creates ideal conditions to elicit his best work, although I’m
pretty sure he doesn’t actually have a job. The point is, a creator’s morning
rituals and routines and disciplines and habits are the very things that allow their
creativity to blossom. It’s simply a matter of sticking with that routine no matter
what. How predictable
is your daily routine?



Reduce daily decisions to routine. There’s something special about diving into your art
before the sun comes up. The world doesn’t make many demands on a creator at
five in the morning. It’s calm, dark and quiet. It’s just you and your ideas.
No distractions. No excuses. Complete control. You almost feel like you’re
getting away with something. Playing with house money. Contributing to a
surplus of imagination. Getting a head start over the rest of the world. It’s empowering as hell. Peewee represents
the power of giving your creativity the first energy of the day. Just imagine
if we could all wake up that excited every morning. What’s more, working first
thing in the morning is also a way to safeguard yourself for the rest of the
day. That hour or two of creating can prevent an entire day of guilty feelings.
Because no matter what life throws at us, we’ll already have that chunk of
creative work banked. Almost like emotional insurance, early morning creating
is tool for orienting you in the direction of daily meaning making. Are you still wasting brain cells in the
morning trying to figure out what to do, or does your daily routine relieve
your mind the necessity of remembering?



Create a framework for inspiration. Peewee’s debut movie was written on the back of his
wildly successful television show, Peewee’s
Playhouse
. We never missed an episode. Saturday mornings, my brother and I
would race into the family room and fawn over his fantastic house filled with
toys, gadgets, talking appliances, puppet characters and a disembodied genie’s
head who lives in a jeweled box. The show used live action comedy, running
gags, viewer interaction, video animation, green screen effects, claymation,
famous guest stars, and of course, awesome eighties music. It was everything a
burgeoning creative mind required. When the show went off the air, I was
devastated. Saturday mornings would never be the same. What’s sad is, years
later, Peewee was arrested for indecent exposure in an adult theater. And it
set off a chain reaction of national media attention that changed the general public’s
view of his work. But I never cared. Still don’t. The character that lived in
my head and lived in my television was all that mattered. Peewee’s playhouse
was the definitive environment for creativity, imagination and whimsy. His
world was the first place that gave me permission to surround myself with
inspiration at all times. Do new ideas
flow as a natural consequence of your personalized workspace?

What did you learn?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Moments of Conception 125 — The Omnidroid Scene from The Incredibles

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today’s clip comes from the Omnidroid scene in The Incredibles:


What can we learn?



Once you have some, you can get some. Omnidroid is an advanced self learning robot. It’s an artificial intelligence machine that corrects its own mistakes by collecting information on the opponents it encounters. That way, every subsequent model improves upon the previous one by correcting flaws found during fights. The creative process works in the same way. Once you have some, you can get some. Take filmmaking. I just finished my first documentary. But since I’ve never made a movie before, it’s all new territory for me. I have no frame of reference for this kind of project. My editor, on the other hand, is a veteran videographer. And he explained that in the filmmaking process, the more things we do, the more we understand what doing means, and that knowledge informs all of our subsequent decisions. Like the robot, with every modification, our creative mechanism becomes more capable against its opponents, solving more problems and fending off potential threats to its plans. And so, each day when we sit down in the edit bay, we learn something new. We discover an angle or a cut or a transition or a color correction that we’ve never tried before. That experience affords us context and understanding and a sense of what’s possible for the scene, which in turn populates our frame of reference and expands the palette from which we create. And this process ultimately allows us to go back and retouch the previous day’s footage with our new found knowledge. Are you flooding your creative process with intense learning experiences?



Be worthy of your advantages. This movie is a brilliant meditation on identity and mediocrity. Syndrome, the super villain responsible for creating the robot, is conniving, manipulative man who seeks personal gain without honest work or achievement. He doesn’t actually possess any special powers, he just has a ton of money. And so, instead of trying to raise the bar, he builds inventions so that everyone can have special powers. Because when everyone’s super, no one will be. Yikes. What a powerful reminder that if want to be special, we have to earn and deserve it. That operating from a mindset of intrinsic remarkability is misguided and even dangerous. Because contrary to what reality television might suggest, true and meaningful achievement isn’t something that just falls in our lap. It’s the result of creating real value for real people. It’s the byproduct of having the guts to risk and the willingness to fail and the desire to change the world for the better. It’s the consequence of doing things for the love and the journey and because we believe in their importance, not because of where they might get us. Syndrome’s goal isn’t to develop and protect his moral sensibility, it’s to pursue things with which to leverage his brand onto the superhero totem pole. And that’s why he ultimately loses. Are you climbing the mountain to see the world or so the world can see you?



The pile never gets smaller. Bob says that no matter how many times you save the world, it always manages to get back in jeopardy againInteresting, considering the same thing could be said about the creative process. Because often times, it feels like a tail that grows back everyday. Just one goddamn thing after another. It’s the pile that never gets to zero, no matter how hard we try. There will always be more to do, all the time, forever, until we die. It’s an infinite regression. Like two opposing mirrors. But over time, we learn to honor the pile. We make peace with it. We even joust with it. And we give thanks to the creative gods that we have because it certainly beats the alternative. Better to constantly have a world to save than to live in one that doesn’t need us. The point is, we all grow tired of cleaning up the mess. Bob doesn’t feel like fighting crime every day, but it’s who he is. The mess is what he lives for. The mess is what brings out the best in him. The mess is why he got into this business in the first place. And when it comes to the creative process––the pure, unromantic slog of sitting down and doing the work, every single day––we don’t have a choice. The world will always be in jeopardy. That’s why we signed up. Creators like their beauty strange, their plots unruly and their duty untamed. Which world is waiting for you to save it?

What did you learn?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


The Nametag Guy Live: Reinvention Means Living Larger Than Your Labels

I recently delivered the closing keynote address at the BeautiControl 2014 Annual Sales Conference. 

I spoke to 3,500 beauty consultants in Dallas, Texas.

This particular clip tells the story about an epiphany I had several years ago. How I learned that it’s okay to be known for more than one thing. Ah, the beauty of reinvention.

Which labels do you need to rip off?

 

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Moments of Conception 124 — The Drawing Scene from The Peanuts Documentary

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today’s clip comes from the drawing scene in The Peanuts Documentary:

What can we learn?

Volume to the power of consistency. The greatest force in the artist’s career is compound
interest. Building our capacity to generate more and more value over time
through the slow, unsexy, but consistent creative increments. It’s a long term,
disciplined strategy, but if we stick to it, the compound interest does most of
the heavy lifting for us. And the result will be more than worth the slog.
Schulz was a master of compound interest. He famously said that the secret of
his success was focusing on drawing one good comic strip every day. Not making
millions. Not achieving fame. Not changing the world. Not advancing his
personal agenda. Not making publishers and newspapers happy. Just the art. Just the work. Just one
good strip, every day. That single goal governed his work for more than fifty
years, and it made him one of the most influential, popular and profitable
cartoonist in the history of the medium. The strip was his mission piece. That
one chunk of art he committed to, focused on and obsessed over, each day, until
it was done, no exceptions; trusting that everything else, including the
television specials, the merchandising, the licensing and the books, would flow
from that. Proof positive, that the best way to beat the odds is with massive
output. That compound interest is what keeps the value growing. How are you incrementally approaching your
creative breakthroughs?



Small times long equals big. Schulz started drawing cartoons when he was a young
boy. But he didn’t go full time as comic creator until he was in his mid
twenties. Meaning, he must have logged tens of thousands of hours putting pen
to paper before he earned a dime. And that’s the part nobody likes to talk
about. Because it represents the pure, unromantic slog of sitting down and
doing the work, every single day. That’s what it all boils down to. Not unlike
the recovering alcoholic who asks himself if he took a drink today, the successful
artist asks himself if he created today. If the answer is yes, and continues to
be yes, then there will be a bright,
green light at the end of that sweaty tunnel. Schulz saw that light. He knew
that his art would take a long time to pay for itself. But he kept cranking out
that strip. And its peak, his comic was syndicated to nearly three thousands
newspapers in seventy counties and twenty languages. He was earning forty
million dollars a year. Even after his death, his brand now generates an
estimate two billion dollars in revenue every year. All because he did the
work. The work that nobody asked him to make. Paid today for the free work he
did yesterday. Are you willing to give
your work away for free until the market is willing to pay for it?



You give me the seed, I’ll cultivate it. Schulz started out in the fifties with a comic strip.
He had no intention of branching out into other media. But when he started created
the animated television programs in the sixties, that new channel gave him the
opportunity to add new dimensions to his work. Additional characters,
personality elements, interesting actions, diverse voice talent, and of course,
the distinctive jazz music. Schulz even said it himself, his animators could
do things with characters that he couldn’t do in the comic strip. And that’s
precisely why the brand became such a colossal success. Schulz was humble
enough to ask for help. To raise his hand when he surpassed the perimeter of
his competence and enlist other people to fill in the gaps. That’s a hard thing
to do. Especially for creators, people who are notoriously independent. People
who hesitate to bring others into their dream, because it represents a loss of
control. But the reality is, we can’t do everything ourselves forever. What we can do, though, is build a vision that infects
people and transfer enthusiasm and inspires them with the purpose behind our work
so they can cultivate the seed we give them. When you’re ready to start stretching other muscles, whom will you
enlist?

What did you learn?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Moments of Conception 123 — The Morning Routine Scene from Wallace & Gromit

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today’s clip comes from the morning routine scene in Wallace and Gromit:

What can we learn?



Eliminate the
roadblocks before they even exist.
Wallace may be an absent minded inventor
whose elaborate contraptions rarely work as intended, but the man understands
the value of routine. After all, he makes a living by his wits. The quality and
frequency of his thoughts determines his livelihood. He can’t afford not to create. And so, he’s built for himself
a framework of discipline, in which enthusiasm grows on its own and builds on
itself. And yet, as ridiculous as his morning routine seems to the outside
observer, it’s exactly what he needs to cultivate the optimal conditions to
make his work happen. In fact, every creator has their own version of this.
Even if it’s something as simple as wearing the same pair of boots or waking up
the same song. Ritual isn’t about size and duration, it’s about thoughtfulness
and regularity. It’s about creating a foundation of security and a ongoing
sense of safety. A bliss station where inspiration
can flow as a natural consequence of your surroundings. Because you
can’t invent your sock off until you invent a contraption for putting your
socks on. What structure might provide you with a
prepared environment for inspiration?



Free to be mentally
active.
Wallace and Gromit has
been translated into over twenty languages and has a massive global following. They’ve
won dozens of awards. And due to their widespread popularity, the characters
have been described as positive international icons that have inspired a whole
new generation of innovative minds. As a kid, I never watched this show. I
don’t even remember it. But looking back, the theme is right up my alley. Because
I came from a family of artists and thinkers and entrepreneurs. In our house, encouraging
creativity was always regarded as a worthwhile endeavor. We were free to be
mentally active. We had physical space to engage in the life of the mind. And people
were constantly pushing each other to see how far they could go with their
ideas. As a result, each of us developed the empowering habit of exercising the
part of our brain that was most original. Each of us learned how to grow up,
but more importantly, how to grow into ourselves. As a creative kid, you can’t
ask for much more than that. Except maybe some cheese. Who was the first person that gave you permission to take steps toward
your own creative health?



Corral your duties
into daily routines.
Wallace’s morning routine is a finely calibrated
mechanism. It’s his personal on ramp. A consistent, repeated sequence of
thoughts and actions that activates the creative subroutine in his head and
snaps him into the appropriate state of mind to start his day. The secret, of
course, is that he doesn’t have to think. Not about his clothes, not about his
food, not about anything. Gromit and his various contraptions do that work for
him. And that’s the whole point. Because nobody wants to have to wake up and
look for options of what to do first. The mind is a terrible office. Allowing
unnecessary thoughts to take up residence in your psyche, especially right as
you’re getting out of bed, is an unhealthy habit. And trying to engage your
brain at six in the morning around menial mundane decisions an exhaustive
process that wastes valuable energy that should be dedicating to making things. The goal, then, is to relieve
your brain of the necessity of remembering. To hold onto the deep grooves of holy habit. To minimize
thinking wherever possible. Even if you have to invent your own dopey
contraption for doing so. What morning routine helps you
unlocks the door to creativity?
  

What did you learn?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 

scott@hellomynameisscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Sign up for daily updates
Connect

Subscribe

Daily updates straight to your inbox.

Copyright ©2020 HELLO, my name is Blog!