How to Smoke What You’re Selling

I don’t do drugs.

But if I did, I would make damn sure that my dealer was someone who regularly used – and enjoyed – the same drugs he sold to me.

THINK ABOUT IT: Wouldn’t you prefer to buy something from someone who’s tried it before?

And, look, I understand that you’re not a drug dealer. Anymore.

But you are a leader. Even if your job title doesn’t say so. Come on: Everyone’s a leader.

Which means, the question that matters is:

Are you smoking what you’re selling?

Rob Bell, pastor of Mars Hill Church and bestselling author of Velvet Elvis suggested the following:

“I cannot lead people somewhere I am not trying to go myself. I don’t need to have arrived, I don’t have to be perfect, but I do need to be on the path. Too many leaders have never descended into the depths of their own souls. They haven’t done the hard, difficult, gut-wrenching work of shining the bright lights on all the years of baggage and destructive messages.”

Now there’s a guy I’d buy drugs from.

Today we’re going to explore a list of strategies for making the experience people have of you more consistent, more approachable and more trustable.

1. Consistency – or lack thereof – affects everyone you encounter. You are on display. You are the result of your own pattern integrity. And your purpose as a leader isn’t a specific task – it’s the way you live your life.

My suggestion is to make your life a constant demonstration. To run a sequence of consistent, similar actions that reinforce to people, “Wow, this guy eats his own dog food.” After all, everything’s a performance and everybody’s watching. May as well play the character you know best – and don’t have to memorize lines for.

Remember: There’s nothing more influential than a living, breathing example. Are your organization’s leaders leading or lip servicing?

2. Surprise people with your impeccable word. Reliability is so rare – it’s become remarkable. Fortunately, you’re the kind of leader who (actually) delivers. That’s all people ask. Especially the ones who put their asses on the line for you.

They don’t want to look stupid.
They don’t want to lose their job.
They don’t want to be the first person to trust you.
They just want you to come through like you said you would.

Imagine that.

Ultimately, the secret is to set expectational clarity. To be more strategic about your intent. To know who you are and who you aren’t; what you’ll stand for and what you won’t stand for. Even if you have to hold a meeting for no reason other than to clarify mutual misapprehension. These are the contributing forces to building consistent reliability. Are you prolific in communicating expectations?

3. Lead with practices – follow with principles. The beliefs held in your heart are immaterial when compared to the actions taken with your feet. Fortunately, we live in a tangible world where concreteness is followable. Lesson learned: Leaders, who articulate values as verbs, win.

Take my Personal Constitution, for example. Every morning during my daily appointment with myself, I ritually revisit my list highest, non-negotiable core values, each of which contains its own sub-list of verbs and action-items. Here’s an excerpt:

PERSISTENCE
Stern and uncompromising feet, commitment to boundaries through self-control and self-discipline; standing my ground without stepping on people’s toes, remaining flexible enough to bend when needed without compromising foundation, and never at the expense of another’s respect.

The cool part is: When you stand for something, decisions are obvious. That’s how you become a verb – by prioritizing orthopraxy (the right practices) over orthodoxy (the right beliefs). Remember: Values aren’t taught – they’re caught. Are you living your faith out in the world or lip servicing your beliefs from behind a desk?

4. Become the physical embodiment of your understanding. My mentor, Bill Jenkins, constantly reminds me: The best leaders eventually become the thing they’ve been teaching. He’s found – and I agree – that after a certain number of years, you just wake up one morning, look in the mirror and think to yourself:

“Wow. I am the message I’m been preaching. I am my own best case study. The word has become flesh.”

The hard part is remaining patient in learning to live physically what you know intellectually. To do so, consider becoming an expert at reflection upon and learning from your experiences.

The harder part is being consistent in letting your life enshrine what your lips proclaim. To do so, consider taking your own advice.

The hardest part is being (and staying) persistent in your efforts to become a living brochure of your own experience. To do so, consider (not) just having a name – but living your name.

Ultimately, when you start to deliver and demonstrate through every breath, you won’t need to sell or promise. Just breathe and infect. How well do you resemble what you worship?

5. Use yourself as your own case study. Approachable leaders know how to translate their unique experiences into relatable, digestible and universal messages that meet their people where they are. Your challenge is to design a system for drawing wisdom from every experience.

Consider asking three questions every time something happens to you: “What lessons could I learn from what just happened to me?” “How does this fit into my organization’s theory of the universe?“ and “What generic attributes of what just happened to me can be extracted and practically applied to my people?”

Whomever you serve as a leader (employees, associates, volunteers, members) recognize this: All you have to draw from is your unique experience. You’re not one of them. You can’t pretend to be one of them. And the moment you do, they’ll smell the veneer faster than a dog smells a fresh bag of Bacon & Cheese Snausages.

The only difference is, instead of drooling all over your leg, they’ll stop trusting you. How are you increasing your ROE, or Return on Experience?

6. Be not humiliated by having others see you truly. Immediately after sweating off five pounds during a typical Bikram Yoga class, I usually grab an ice-cold bottle of water and plop down on the sidewalk to recover. I call it a Reverse Sauna: The air is chilly, the breeze feels great and the concrete is cool on my legs. Can’t beat it.

And sure, I look a bit out of place doing so the parking lot. Then again, I’ve also been wearing a nametag twenty-four-seven for the past ten years. Kind of used to not fitting in by now.

Anyway, what fascinates me is Rick, the guy in my class who always gives me guff about it: “Scott, aren’t you worried that one of your clients will spot you out here?”

To which I respond, “Not really. My clients hire me because I’m a person – not just a personality. And when you’re sitting on the ground half-naked, sweating, steaming and exhausted – there’s no hiding out. And I have no problem with anyone seeing me like this.”

Lesson learned: Don’t back down from unguarded moments. Invite people to catch a glimpse of your naked truth, laid bear. After all, to truly live heroically is to commit to and act from the truest version of yourself – every day. How much loyalty are you sacrificing because you’re terrified of exposing a part of yourself you don’t like?

REMEMBER: Duplicity breeds distrust.

Shakespeare was right: Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

Your leadership challenge moving forward is as follows:

Match outer appearance and inner substance.
Align your onstage performance and backstage reality.
Make the message you preach the dominant truth of your life.
Give people the tools they need to build the world you envision.

Soon people from all around the world will form a line around the corner just to score a dime bag of your stuff.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Are you smoking what you’re selling?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
For the list called, “14 Things You Don’t Have to Do Anymore,” send an email to me, and I’ll send you the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Entrepreneur, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Who’s quoting YOU?

Check out Scott’s Online Quotation Database for a bite-sized education on branding success!

www.stuffscottsaid.com.

Don’t Even Think About Sending Another Message to Your Customers Until You’ve Asked These Nine Questions

97%.

According to a 2009 Microsoft Security Report, that’s the percentage of sent emails that are unwanted.

THINK ABOUT IT: If you add up all the spam you received yesterday, plus the hundred or so emails you received from people you don’t know selling you things you don’t want, plus the additional hundred emails from customers, coworkers, superiors, employees, friends and family members that were completely inconsequential and utterly irrelevant to your life, I’d say 97% is fairly accurate.

BUT HERE’S THE QUESTION THAT MATTERS: What’s your strategy for being part of the 3%?

Whether you’re emailing, conversing, tweeting or texting, what – specifically – are you doing to make sure your message don’t end up in the trash?

ANSWER: Not enough.

Today, you’re going to create a filter to make sure your messages are sent in a respectful, approachable and value-driven manner. We’ll explore nine questions to ask yourself before you press the “send” button.

NOTE: As you read them, keep two caveats in mind:

First, don’t ask every question before you send every message. Especially if you’re just pinging somebody who works down the hall. That would either drive you crazy or drive your productivity into the ground. The secret is to increase your awareness of the principles behind these questions.

Secondly, this isn’t about emailing. In fact, emailing is quickly approaching irrelevancy. Ever met someone under twenty-two? They don’t email. According to the students I know, “Email is the new snail mail.” In short: This is about respect. This is about smart communication. And this is about being (not just) approachable – but e-proachable.

I challenge you to think about other channels of communication besides email – Skype, texting, conference calls, meetings, online messaging – where these same ideas can be applied.

1. Have I demonstrated a valid reason for my persistence? The real secret isn’t just being persistent – but demonstrating a valid motivation for your persistence. Otherwise you come off as pushy.

Lesson learned: Set expectational clarity immediately. Punch people in the face with your purpose. Be respectful and intelligent enough to state your reason for messaging within the first two lines or first two seconds.

2. Does this message prove that I care? You can’t bastardize “caring” into a technique. There’s no formula. There’s no handbook. There’s no seven-step system. And it’s not about doing it the right way – it’s more about your willingness to care, you awareness of caring, and consistency with which you do care.

Suggestion: Respond to people’s emotions first. Lead with empathy. Put your person before your profession. It’s amazing: In our increasingly loud, fast and busy world, caring is almost so rare it’s become remarkable. Give it a try.

3. Did I lay a foundation of affirmation? Any message with a fundamentally affirmative orientation is more openable, digestible and memorable. Here are three quick line items:

First, substitute unnecessary apologies for “Thank you.”

Second, preface your answers to inquiries with, “Awesome question!” “Thank God somebody finally asked me that!”

Third, use the two words human beings love more than anything: “You’re right!”

Even if you’re sending an message to inform a guest that his room won’t be ready until they finish scraping the curry stains off the ceiling from last night’s goat sacrifice, these Phrases That Payses insert positivity into even the most negative situations.

4. Is my message low-carb? Joe Friday was onto something. “Just the facts, ma’am” isn’t a one-liner – it’s a lifestyle. Take it from him: Get to the point. Cut to the chase. Don’t waste sentences. Instead, run your message through the filter of MCI, or meaningful concrete immediacy.

Meaningful meaning relevant to the recipient.
Concrete meaning concise and low-carb, aka, “all meat – no potatoes.”
Immediacy meaning applicable and actionable now.

No jargon. No outdated metaphors, bromides or unclear analogies. Zero into the heart of the matter.

5. How have I appealed to self-interest? More specifically: What drives this person? What is this person’s success seed? What is the key to this person’s heart? Who does this person need to look good for? What does this person’s self-interest hinge upon? What could I say in my voicemail that would absolutely piss this person off more than anything?

These are the questions you need to answer to figure out what this person needs to hear to want to hear more.

6. What subject line, header or hook would make me want to open this? Probably something interesting, curious and creative that does not resemble spam in any way. Openable, listenable messages need to appeal to the emotions – and occasionally, the ego – of the other person.

For example, whenever I read a new book that rocks, I email the author. Every time. Normally, my subject line is something like, “13 cool things I learned from reading your book.”

What author could resist? I’m an author myself, and if someone wrote me an email with that subject line, I’d pull over on the side of the interstate just to learn how awesome I am. Next time you send a message, think about what you could say – in this moment – that would be the exact opposite as everyone else.

7. If I waited twenty-four hours to send this message, what would change? Unless it’s a time sensitive issue, consider waiting a day before you press the send button. Maybe you’d edit the message. Maybe you’d completely change the message. Maybe you’d reconsider sending the message at all.

“What a difference a day makes” isn’t a cliché – it’s a reality. Think about it: When’s the last time you heard your coworker say, “Damn it! I really should have overreacted sooner!”

8. Does this email that I’m about to send demonstrate a deep respect for the other person’s most precious commodity? I get a few hundred emails a day. And I’m constantly amazed – almost to the point of being entertained – how often I receive emails from complete strangers who have zero respect for my time.

I’m sorry, but if we’ve never met before, and you can’t tell me what you want in five sentences or less, I’m going to delete your email. Nothing personal. I’m sure you’re a very nice person. And I’m sure your seven hundred word anecdote about how you wound up working in the adult diaper business is a fascinating tale.

But I have books to write.

And I have no remorse about pressing the delete button on a message sent by someone who forgot to press the respect button.

9. What value am I delivering by sending this? If you can’t answer this question, you lose before you even press the send button. Most communications fall under two categories: Value or vanity. Which word describes your messages? Hopefully the latter. Because the goal is to help the other person in a way that she would consider to be substantial.

For example, one of the practices I personally employ on a daily basis is to send a continuous flow of education. Not just information. Any schmo can do that. You need to be a broker of wisdom – an impulsive and compulsive finder and messenger of truth. And you have a responsibility to deliver that truth in a three-dimensional, educational way.

REMEMBER: Whether you’re communicating via email, text, Skype, DM or instant messenger, the rules are all the same.

Be mindful.
Be respectful
Be e-pproachable.

And if you keep these questions in the back of your mind before sending your next message, you’ll earn a spot at the top of your customers’ minds when they receive it.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What’s your filter for sending messages to your people?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
For the list called, “20 Ways to Make Customers Feel Comfortable,” send an email to me, and I’ll send you the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Coach, Entrepreneur
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Who’s quoting YOU?

Check out Scott’s Online Quotation Database for a bite-sized education on branding success!

www.stuffscottsaid.com.

How to Evangelize without Making Strangers Walk in the Other Direction

When I was in kindergarten, our class has a Tasting Party.

Every student had to eat one of everything. Everything. Even if they didn’t like it – they had to try it.

I remember putting a green olive in mouth.

Then I remember immediately gagging and vomiting.

It was the worst thing I’d ever tasted in my five short years on this planet.

I never ate another green olive again. Ever. And now, twenty-five years later, I still refuse to eat them. I just can’t escape the taste of that traumatic childhood experience.

Nothing personal against olives. I’m sure they’re delicious. And it’s not their fault I don’t like them.

THE (REAL) PROBLEM IS: Force fed truth almost always tastes terrible.

But we’re not talking about olives anymore.

When you try to evangelize by cramming things down people’s throats – without consideration or consent – you lose. And so do they.

Now, by “they,’ I’m referring to the people you’re currently evangelizing:

Employees.
Customers.
Coworkers.
Strangers.
Guests.
Perspective members.
New recruits.

Now, I understand the word “evangelize” typically defaults to the religious arena. But the strategies you’re about to read have been democratized for your secular enjoyment. Feel free to plug yourself into the equations as you see fit.

Let’s explore a compendium of practices for sharing your gospel (that is, the “good news” about your organization, idea, group, whatever) in a more approachable way.

1. Take the first step. My friend Jim Henderson, author of Jim & Casper Go to Church, takes a counterintuitive stance on evangelism:

“Are you getting people to join you, or are you trying to join them first?” he asks. In this instance, proactivity is the secret. Sticking yourself out there is the way. After all, approachability is a two-way street. Your mission is to give people permission. Who is just waiting to be joined first?

2. Indulge in your humanity. Personality typing is overrated. Here’s the reality: All of us are Type H – Human. That’s the only label that matters. Treat people accordingly. My suggestion: Volunteer to be mortal. Even if that means something simple like taking a breathe between moments of gushing about your organization.

It’s okay to let people hear you breathe. Evangelism without inhaling fails. Create more space in the conversation, and everything changes. Are you a master of the pause?

3. Assess and disclose your vulnerabilities. By being more open about your failures and sins; maybe your critics would be more apt to listen to you. Like Donald Miller, author of Blue Like Jazz, the man who set up “confessional booths” at college campuses across the country.

Check this out: When curious students walked in, he apologized to them for being a crappy Christian. Interestingly, his reverse approach diffused the situation and helped strangers open up about their own shortcomings. How are you leveraging your vulnerability to earn people’s trust?

4. Love makes things easier. In Rob Bell’s tremendous book, Velvet Elvis, he said, “You rarely defend the things you love. You enjoy them, tell others about them and invite others to enjoy with you.” Evangelism is that easy: Show people the picture of what you love – then give them the opportunity to see what you see. No need to spit scripture or force-feed statistics. Just transfer emotion.

Infect people with your passion by allowing it to overflow into the conversation. Allow expression to flow unhindered and unencumbered. But, stay away from proclamational evangelism (crying out publicly, wearing a sandwich board around your neck).

And steer clear of confrontational evangelism (creating conflict interpersonally, scaring people into hiding). Instead, shoot for incarnational evangelism (embodying your truth, consistently and lovingly). Are you defending or infecting?

5. Maintain a posture of grace. Let’s say you’re faced with a few Doubting Thomases. No problem. The secret is to accommodate their unbelief, without running after people begging and pleading to reconsider. Act with propriety. Present your message – your gospel – in a way that’s (just) challenging enough to disqualify the disinterested, yet provoke the desirous.

And if you still sense that it’s a lost cause, let them go. Stop chasing after the disinterested. Spend time with people who want to be with you. Remember: You can’t make someone believe – all you can do is give her the option. Are your fingers pointing or clenched in a fist?

6. Pinpoint the influences. In the book Gentle Persuasion, author Dr. Joe Aldrich shares a helpful list of factors that influence a person’s receptivity. Adjust your evangelism efforts accordingly:

• The existing loyalties of this person. Where else are they affiliated?
• The transitions facing the individual. What changes are they going through?
• The condition of the soil of this person’s soul. What is their heart leaning heavily toward?
• The nature and stability of this person’s relationships. Whom do they love, and who loves them?
• The previous attempts to approach or invite this person. Who burned, scared or scarred them in the past?
• The caricatures that distort someone’s grasp of something. What existing prejudices do they hold?
• The nature and frequency of past contacts with this person. How many times have they already been bugged?
• The circumstances under which someone learned something. Do they believe what they believe because they actually believe, or because someone told them to believe and they mindlessly followed?
• The people this person has known and their influence upon him. Who are they hanging with?
• The degree of satisfaction or lack thereof with this person’s life. Are they happy?
• The spot this person sits on the continuum between opposition and acceptance of something. What are they resisting?

Whomever your current interpersonal situation involves, I challenge you to connect those people to these factors. Establish a profile of perfect receptivity. Map out a few of the answers to clarify the true nature of people’s reluctance.

Remember: There’s nothing you can do unless someone invites the challenge. There’s no magic pill you can slip in a customer’s cocktail to guarantee they’ll say, “I’ll meet you in the bathroom in five minutes.” Ascertain fit first. What barriers to communicating freely and openly exist between you and this person?

7. Reverse the approach. Don’t finagle a way to steer the conversation toward your agenda. Don’t unnaturally sneak your idea into every conversation. And don’t telegraph an attitude of “finish up and finish telling me your problem so I can give you the solution I already thought of.”

Be the opposite of every evangelist you’ve ever met. Practice nonprescriptiveness. Loosen your arrogance clamp. And know that if your feet are too firmly planted, you won’t be able to walk. After all, most people are tired of the “told, sold and scold” approach. They prefer to be invited, inspired and included. Which path are your evangelism efforts taking?

8. Reprogram people’s experience banks. Once you’ve seen a ghost, you’re always afraid of the dark. That’s the problem with traditional evangelism: Force-fed truth causes people to develop allergies toward that truth. Which means the bodily reaction anytime that truth is encountered will be rejection. Yikes.

Lesson learned: If you force-feed people once, and they may never swallow again.

As I mentioned, I’ve haven’t eaten a green olive since I was five years old. Who knows if I’ll ever eat one again? Your reprogramming challenge is two fold: (1) Watch for psychologically negative experiences, then, (2) Provide consistent, positive examples to help shift people’s attitude about your organization, product or idea. Are you aggressively investing in making remarkable moments that move customers?

9. Miracles capture attention.As I become president of my local chapter of National Speakers Association, I plan to introduce a program called, “Without NSA.” It was simple: At the beginning of every meeting, one member is selected to share a “miracle,” aka, something that never would have been possible without the organization’s assistance. Call it a testimony. Call it a story. Call it the price of admission. Whatever.

The point is: We invited people to share their personal experience. The benefit of the benefit of the benefit of membership. The kind of stuff you can’t find on the website or in the brochure. The kind of stuff that makes first-timers and guests think, “And where, exactly, is this many-splendored thing they sing about?” How are you soliciting, sharing and capturing the miracles of being part of your organization?

10. Don’t inform – form. Surprise creates anxiety in the air, which is the best time to give someone new ideas. So, anything that makes people pause – that is, to consider your idea and become a little more conscious – is always worth the time.

Try this: Ask people to remember a time in their life when they sad, “I’d never do that!” Then ask them to tell you the story about when they did it. You’ll find people to be significantly more receptive to your ideas once they’ve just proven to themselves that they’re (clearly) willing to explore new things. How could you make the whole song a chorus?

11. Orthopraxy, not orthodoxy. Focus your efforts on the right practices – not the right beliefs. Instead of practicing what you preach; try preaching what you practice. Be good news before you share it. Make sure the message you’re preaching is the dominant reality of your life.

Note any gaps between your onstage performance and your backstage reality. Announce your intentions through your actions. That way your evangelism efforts will be a function of insinuation, not imposition. Remember: people respond to people who have been there. Are you smoking what you’re selling?

12. Caring (actually) works. But not as a technique. You can’t bastardize caring into a strategy. There’s no formula. There’s no handbook. There’s no seven-step system. It’s not about doing it the right way – it’s more about your willingness to care, you awareness of caring, and consistency with which you do care.

Consider these two ideas: First, people who feel unnecessary won’t give you their attention. It all depends on what you see when you see people. You have to make them feel essential. Not just important, valued, special and heard – but essential.

Secondly, people won’t to respond to a voice that doesn’t care. Especially if you only care about looking like you care. That doesn’t count. If your motivations for spreading the gospel are misguided, something isn’t better than nothing. In fact, nothing might be better than anything. Caring has a smell, and people know when it’s missing. Will you dare to care?

REMEMBER: Evangelism is a contact sport. No contact = No impact.

As Novelist John Lecarre once said, “A desk is a dangerous place to watch the world.”

So, get out there.

Stop force-feeding truth.
Leave behind your arsenal of deception.
Give clear direction of what you want people to follow.
Get across what you want to say in the most direct way possible.

And know that cramming something down people’s throats – whether it’s an idea, a product, a business, a belief system or a green olive – simply doesn’t work.

Which reminds me: Maybe I’ll send this blog post my kindergarten teacher.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How do you evangelize?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
For the list called, “20 Ways to Make Customers Feel Comfortable,” send an email to me, and I’ll send you the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Coach, Entrepreneur
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Who’s quoting YOU?

Check out Scott’s Online Quotation Database for a bite-sized education on branding success!

www.stuffscottsaid.com.

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