Nametag Guy LIVE: People Buy People First

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What’s your philosophy on people?

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For a list called “34 Cultural Trends that (should) Change Your Business,” send an email to scott@hellomynameisscott.comM and I’ll do my best to enlighten you 🙂

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

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9 things people don’t care about

1. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … how good you are.
They care how good you’re going to help them become.

2. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … what you’ve done.
They care what you’ve learned, and how those lessons can help them.

3. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … what you can’t do.
They care what you CAN do.

4. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … what they hear you say.
They care what they SEE you DO.

5. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … what you do for a living.
They care what you’re passionate about.

6. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … if you’re having a bad day.
They care how you’re going to help them have a better day.

7. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … about price.
They care about value, convenience and risk.

8. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … about your company.
They care about the problems your company can solve.

9. PEOPLE DON’T CARE … about being apologized to.
They care about answers, solutions and resolutions.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What three things do YOU think people (don’t) care about?

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Post your list here!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag

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The advantage of being an outsider

In the month of October alone, my clients include: inner-city librarians, municipal landfill owners, funeral directors, paper shredding companies, school lunch ladies and recruiters.

God I love my job!

Anyway, this made me realize something: objectivity is equity.

And this is GREAT news for you if you’re a consultant, speaker, facilitator or other form of independent contractor.

See, my clients tell me that employees are tired of listening to their bosses.

Same old information. Same old company. Same old industry.

BOR-ING.

They need fresh air.
They need new perspective.
They need someone from the outside.

And that’s where you come in.

SO, REMEMBER THIS: being an outsider is a position of value.

Here’s why:

1. OUTSIDERS … can be truly objective.

o Because they have little or no bias.
o Because they can recognize patterns immediately
o Because they have no stake in the company or organization.
o Because they don’t bring vested interests to an existing problem.
o Because they can explore the structure of an organization with fresh eyes.
o Because they’re not viewed as a threat, which diffuses defensiveness and increases the willingness to listen.

2. OUTSIDERS … don’t face traditional barriers.

o Because they are unaware of common creative blocks.
o Because they’re not subject internal politics of the organization.
o Because they can explore assumptions the organization that were never thought of or taken for granted

3. OUTSIDERS … can deliver independent thought.

o Because their thinking patterns are different.
o Because they’re detached from the outcomes.
o Because they’re not so close to the situation and therefore have limited agendas.
o Because their wealth of diverse background experience applies cross-industrially.

So, next time you’re trying to secure a new client, just remember: it’s OK to be an outsider.

Outsiders observe, think and speak from a position of value and equity.

REMEMBER: it’s a lot easier to break the limit when you don’t know the limit exists.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Are you an outsider?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Post your best story or example in which being an outsider enabled you to help your clients!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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On working in the people business

It doesn’t matter what you sell.
It doesn’t matter what you create.
It doesn’t matter what your job title says.
It doesn’t matter what service you provide.

You work in the People Business.

As such, it’s important to remember several things:

1. People buy people first.

2. People like to do business with their friends.

3. People don’t trust companies; they trust people.

4. People aren’t loyal to companies, they’re loyal to people.

5. People only do business with you for three reasons: they’ve heard you, they’ve heard OF you, or someone they TRUST has heard of you,

6. When people like each other, the rules change. (Jim Henderson)

7. The only thing people can judge you on: how engaging with you makes them feel. (Seth Godin)

8. The more we meet and interact with people, the more likely we are to become friends with them.

9. People either check you on or check you off.

10. The more shopper-employee contacts that take place, the greater the average sale. (Paco Underhill)

11. People don’t give to causes; they give to people.

12. People don’t want to hire consultants, speakers, trainers or recruiters. They want to hire smart, cool people who happen to consult. Or speak. Or train. Or recruit. Or whatever. So be smarter and cooler.

13. Which means: lead with your person; follow with your profession. Values before vocation. Individuality before industry. Humanity before statistics. Personality before position.

14. AND REMEMBER: if they like you as a person, they MIGHT hire you. But if they don’t like you as a person, they DEFINITELY won’t hire you.

And last but not least, the summation of the first 14 points:

15. Friendly always wins.

So…

It doesn’t matter what you sell.
It doesn’t matter what you create.
It doesn’t matter what your job title says.
It doesn’t matter what service you provide.

You work in the People Business.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How long have you been working in the People Business?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share your additional thoughts on the nature of this “industry.”

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


Are you a friend of The Nametag Network?

Read more blogs!
Rent Scott’s Brain!
Download articles and ebooks!
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Let’s (not) get right down to business

Why do people always insist on “getting right down to business?”

What’s the hurry?

You got somewhere else to be?

HERE’S AN IDEA: try connecting first!

See, sometimes if you get right down to business, you run the risk of:

1. Making someone feel uncomfortable
2. Creating an unnecessary sense of urgency
3. NOT establishing trust

Think of it this way…

You’re on a first date.
You sit down to the table.
You start munching on some bread.

When the drinks arrive, you say, “Alright, here’s the deal, Sandy. We’ve been going out for about 15 minutes, right? Well, whaddaya say you and me get hitched?”

“Wait! Where are you going my love? We haven’t even talked about our kids’ names yet! Look! I brought a list with me. What do you think of ‘Dakota’?”

AND … game over.

LESSON LEARNED: don’t get right down to business.

Instead, get right up to connecting.

Here are three tips to keep in mind:

1. Lead with your person; follow with your profession. Individuality before industry. Personality before position. Values before vocation. Find a way to open your conversation NOT about the weather, NOT about traffic, NOT about work; but rather, about each other.

2. Practice the five-minute rule. The moment you enter someone’s office, shake hands or sit down, start your mental clock. Make it your goal NOT to talk about anything business related for the first five minutes.

3. Establish the CPI. This stands for the “Common Point of Interest.” And it’s absolutely essential in the first few minutes of every conversation. See, people like you when they find out how much they ARE like you. And conversation is about common ground.

So, next time you sit down with a hot prospect, remember:

Friendly leads to familiar.
Familiar leads to comfortable.
Comfortable leads to trust.

And TRUST is foundation of all business.

So, get friendly FIRST.

Then (and only then) should you get right down to business.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What’s your policy for “connecting first”

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share it here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
www.hellomynameisscott.com

Are you the luckiest person you know?

Watch Scott’s interview on 20/20!

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The longer they take, the less they buy

PICTURE THIS: you walk into Borders on a Sunday afternoon. You head over to the business section to pick up the latest book on leadership.

Flipping through, you see nothing remarkable … yet.

So you keep flipping. And flipping. And flipping. Frustratingly hoping to come across a poignant sentence, a cool graph or an astonishing picture to use in tomorrow’s staff meeting.

But to no avail.

About seven minutes go by. You reach the appendix of the book, having found nothing that stood out.

Well, back to the shelf this goes! You think.

And then.

Then something else catches your eye.

“Hmm. What’s this…?” you say.

You grab a different book. You lean up against the shelf and randomly open it to page 147.

And within three seconds, you’re smiling. Nodding and affirming and pointing out a piece of leadership advice that’s SO relevant (and SO SIMPLE), you say to yourself, “Wow. That’s goooood! I’m buying this book for my boss!”

So you do.

And it only took … what? A few seconds?

LESSON LEARNED: the longer they take, the less they buy.

In Doug Hall’s (amazing) Jumpstart Your Brain, he shares several brilliant observations on this very topic.

Based on his extensive research with Proctor & Gamble’s retail division, Doug learned three things:

1. Complexity generates contemplation. You lose when your customer has to contemplate your idea. In the process of contemplating, customers start looking at other options.

2. Get them early. If it takes more than ten seconds to explain or grasp, it’s probably not a wicked good idea.

3. Simple ideas are self-evident. And self-evident products make you want to pick them up when you see the name and the front of the package. No additional communication required.

It’s kind of like the end of Jerry Maguire.

Tom Cruise barges into Rene Zelwegger’s house to profess his love for her. He rambles on and on about how she “completes” him. Everyone in the audience is sobbing.

Eventually, she interrupts his monologue and says, “You had me at hello.”

You had me at hello.

That’s exactly what you need to do.

You need to have them at hello.

Because if you don’t, every second that passes decreases the probability of a sale.

The sale of…

Your idea.
Your self.
Your service.
Your product.

LESSON LEARNED: if you don’t have them at hello, it’s already too late.

Because the longer they take, the less they buy.

HERE’S HOW I KNOW THIS: I’ve been wearing a nametag 24-7 for the past 2,431 days.

I do it to make people friendlier. That’s it!

And I’ve probably explained this idea to well over 100,000 people.

Now, according to seven years of non-scientific, empirical data, approximately 10% of the people I encounter will think I’m out of my damn mind.

(Which is true.)

But these people just don’t (and won’t) get it.

They require me to cite scientific data.
They ask me to explain my philosophy over and over.
They argue relentlessly about the validitiy of wearing a nametag.

(And all the while I’m thinking: dude, it’s not that complicated. Nametags = friendlier people)

Which makes me realize something: these people will NEVER, at any point, accept, like or embrace my idea.

Because I never had them at hello.

See, first impressions are based on instinct and emotion. And because they tend to be correct, the first impressions people form about you will probably stay in their minds forever.

After all, people put pressure on themselves to behave consistently with their own existing commitments.

This is known as the primacy effect. Meaning, the information people see or learn about you is more powerful than what is learned later.

IN SHORT: if it takes too long for someone to “get” you (or your idea or your product), they’re probably not going to buy into it. Ever.

The longer they take, the less they buy.

Also, here’s something else I’ve noticed after 2,430 days:

90% of the people I encounter, only SECONDS after hearing that I choose to wear a nametag all the time, will say to me, “That’s the coolest idea I’ve ever heard!”

And they not only embrace the idea, but usually tell at least 10 people about it.

Because I had them at hello.

And it took … what? Three seconds?

Right. Because if the longer they take, the less they buy; then the SHORTER they take, they MORE they buy!

OK. So, here’s what this means for you:

1. KEEP it simple. Say ONE thing. Assure that your ideas; products, services and marketing materials are self-evident. That they need no further communication. That people “get” your stuff right away.

2. MAKE it easy. Ever read a business book without boldface, underlines, italics, font changes or pictures? It’s a pain in the butt! See, few authors understand the value of architecture in writing. So, even if you don’t write books, remember: make it easy. Punch people in the face with what they need to see, hear and know about your business right away.

3. TOUCH it up. If you find that it’s taking too long to convince people, don’t worry! This is your opportunity to tweak your idea, sales pitch or product. Brainstorm several approaches and practice them on friends. If you “get them at hello,” you’re on the right track. Super easy litmus test.

Ultimately, what we’re talking about is a first impression.

Of you.
Of your ideas.
Of your business.

SO REMEMBER: complexity generates contemplation; and contemplation kills sales.

Get them at hello.

Because they longer they take, the less they buy.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Do you have people at hello?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share an example of someone who had YOU at hello with THEIR business idea.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
www.hellomynameisscott.com

Are you the luckiest person you know?

Watch Scott’s interview on 20/20!

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10 different approaches for your 10-second commercial

It’s the most frequently asked question, like, ever.

“So, what do YOU do?”

So many answers, so little time.

THE CHALLENGE: coming up with a memorable, concise and brand-consistent message.

However, there’s no one-way to do it! Let’s explore ten different approaches to answering this question.

1. The Lois Creamer Approach
“I work with (target market) who want to (desired outcome) so they can (benefit).”

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“I work with small business owners who want to increase productivity so they can spend more time their families.”

2. The Dick Brusso Approach
“I help (target market) accomplish (desired outcome) through (media through which you help achieve that outcome).”

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“I help hotel chains boost their customer service numbers through online training programs.”

3. The John Jantsch Approach
“I (verb) (target market) (benefit).”

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“I educate furniture salespeople on closing techniques.”
4. The Gitomer Approach
Just say something funny and confident.

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“I’m the greatest valet parker in the world!”

5. The Paul Edwards Approach
(Common Problem) + (Reason Why) + (Positioning Statement)

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“You know how marathon runners’ backs always hurt after a long jog? Well, that’s because their vertebrae are out of sync. See, I’m a chiropractor and I help marathon runners get their bones back into shape so they can break their personal running records!”

6. The Joke Approach
Say something unexpected and funny to disarm the situation, then follow-up with a real answer.

EXAMPLE:
“So, what do YOU do?”

“As little as possible!”

(Insert gut-busting laughter here.)

“But seriously, my job is to…”
7.The Steve Hughes Approach
Just pretend you’re talking to a five year old.

EXAMPLE: “So, what do you do?”

“I help grown-ups get better at show and tell!”

8. The Benefit of the Benefit Approach
I make (target market) (benefit of the benefit)

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

“I make customers breathless.”

9. The Jeff Magee Approach
I do three things…

EXAMPLE:

“So, what do YOU do?”

I do three things: write books, give speeches and conduct teleseminars on how to expand your creativity.

10. The Scott Ginsberg Approach
(“Huh?”) + (Value Statement) + (“Aha!”)

“I wear a nametag 24-7!”

“Huh? Are you serious?”

“Yep! And I write books, speeches and training materials on approachability.”

“Ohhhhh,” she nodded. “I get it. Cool! We should hire you.”

Yes. Yes you should. Here’s my fee schedule 😉

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What’s your approach to the 10-second commercial?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share your formula here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag

Download Scott’s new book!
Right here, right now, for FREE, no strings.

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Keep it Alive, Part 4

(Read part one, part deux and part tres of this series here!)

Consider these three facts:

1. People buy people first.
2. People like (and want) to do business with their friends.
3. People aren’t loyal to companies, they’re loyal to people.

So … doesn’t it just make sense to, like, make friends with everybody?

I dunno. Maybe it’s just me.

That’s why I don’t believe in networking.

Networking, schmetworking.

The last time that word carried any meaning was in 1997.

The world is tired of it. It’s overused, cliché and slightly annoying. Not to mention it often conjures up negative images like:

1. Dealing the deck of business cards to everyone in sight
2. One-sided conversations based on how others can help you.
3. Superficial conversations with little or no value offered to the other person.

Stop networking and start making friends.

Everywhere you go, with everyone you meet. For no reason other than to make friends.

Zero motive conversations.

Then work your butt off to keep those relationships alive!

That’s it.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag

Download Scott’s new book!
Right here, right now, for FREE, no strings.

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Be non-checkoffable

People make mental notes.

Notes that indicate whether or not they like you.
Notes that indicate whether or not they should do business with you.
Notes that indicate whether or not they should refer their friends to you.

And if you read Blink, you learned that people make these mental notes quickly.

Like, within a few seconds.

(Yikes!)

These “people,” represent a certain pool of individuals.

Customers, prospects and strangers who are exposed to you, your brand and your values…

Who are just WAITING to check you OFF.

Or, check you ON.

Your challenge, then, as my mentor Jeffrey Gitomer says, “Is to be yourself so you become non-checkoffable.”

Become non-checkoffable. THAT is the critical key to making an UNFORGETTABLE first impression.

See, because they’re based on instinct and emotion; and because they’re usually correct, the first impressions people form about you will probably stay in their minds forever.

WHY? Because people put pressure on themselves to behave consistently with their own existing commitments.

This is known as the primacy effect. Meaning, the information people see or learn about you is more powerful than what is learned later.

FOR EXAMPLE: You meet someone at a conference. He says something that sort of rubs you the wrong way. Then, somewhere in the back of your mind you think, “OK brain, I’ve just decided that I don’t like this new guy Steve. Make a mental note to check him off.”

And that’s it. In your mind, he’s a gonner. Adios Esteban!

On the other hand, if you don’t want to end up like Steve, consider these three suggestions to avoid getting checked off:

1. Consistency. Between your words and actions. Between your values and vocation. Between your emails, phone calls and conversations. Because consistency is far better than rare moments of greatness.

2. Commitment. To service. To approachability. To delivering value. And most importantly, visually reminding people that you’re committed to them.

3. Coolness. Just relax. Don’t get caught up in the potential frenzy of first impressions. If you’re on a sales call, about to attend a conference or meet a prospect for lunch, try a few breathing exercises first. Whatever it takes to calm down and stay cool.

KEEP IN MIND: some people (about 10%), no matter how hard you try to convince otherwise, WILL check you off.

Don’t sweat it. They probably check everybody off. So, forget about the 10 and focus on the 90.

Practice consistency, commitment and coolness, and the majority of people you meet will check you ON.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What’s your secret for becoming non-checkoffable?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share it here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag

Download Scott’s new book!
Right here, right now, for FREE, no strings.

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People rarely get mad at…

People rarely get mad at a speaker for going short.

People rarely get mad at a writer for keeping it short.

People rarely get mad at a businessperson who was too easy to reach.

People rarely get mad at a businessperson who gave too much value first.

People rarely get mad at a boss who listened too much.

People rarely get mad at a blogger for giving away too much free content.

People rarely get mad at a CEO that admitted her mistakes.

People rarely get mad at a consultant for being too creative.

People rarely get mad at a salesperson for being too positive.

People rarely get mad at a teammate who was too good.

(Of course, there are exceptions.)

Some people get mad at just about everybody.

And if that ever happens to you, don’t sweat it.

Probably says more about them than it does about you.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What else do people rarely get mad at?

LET SUGGEST THIS…
Share your list here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag
www.hellomynameisscott.com

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