If you don’t quote yourself, nobody else will

So, you’re pretty smart.

And you’ve said some pretty smart things.

But you didn’t write them down, did you?

Which means you don’t (regularly) quote yourself, do you?

BIG mistake.

LESSON LEARNED: If want other people to quote YOU, you need to quote yourself first.

Because if you don’t quote yourself, nobody else will.

Don’t worry. It doesn’t make you an egomaniac.

It just means that, as a creative professional, as a thought leader, you’re taking ownership of (and protecting) your intellectual property.

Here are a few steps you can take to start quoting yourself today!

1. Pay attention. Sometimes you might say something smart and think, “Damn, that was pretty good!” Or a friend of yours might ask, “Hey, can I quote you on that?” When things like this happen, you MUST recognize them as cues to your brilliance. Because you ARE brilliant.

2. Write it down. The next step is to capture your thoughts. Remember, if you don’t write it down, it never happened! So, the moment you say something brilliant, grab your jotter, a piece of paper, a napkin or your laptop and WRITE IT DOWN. This is the most important step.

3. Verify it. Before you go taking credit for your (supposedly) original thought, be sure to validate it. Start by asking yourself three questions:

a. Is this thought (really) mine?
b. Has this thought passed through the test of my personal experience?
c. How can I discover whether or not this is my own thinking?

If yes, the next step is to google the full, exact phrase in quotations. You need to make sure someone hasn’t already said it, wrote it, claimed it or wrote a book with the title of it. This will help you avoid plagiarism and maintain your originality.

(NOTE: yes, I know, there’s nothing new under the sun. Whatever brilliant thought you’ve had, somebody has probably said it – or something like it – before. But that doesn’t mean they wrote it down. And if it doesn’t exist on google, it doesn’t exist! REMEMBER: Writers keepers, losers weepers.)

4. Store it. Keep a file on your computer or a folder on your desk called, “Smart Things I’ve Said” or “My Quotations” or “Dave’s One-Liners.” Update it regularly with your new quotations.

5. Share it. Now comes the fun part – physically quoting yourself! Here are a few suggestions:

*Create a special report, ebook, whitepaper blog post or video cliff notes that includes all of your quotations. Give it away for free to EVERYBODY. Especially customers, prospects and colleagues.

*Print a few thousand “philosophy cards” that include your ten best quotes. Hand them out to EVERYBODY. For more information on how to create a philosophy card, check this out.

*In your writings, don’t hesitate to quote yourself. Use ownership phrases like, “Like I always say,” “My philosophy is,” and “I like to tell my readers/audience members.”

*In your blog posts, create customized, trademarked images of your quotations that credit your name and URL. This will make it VERY easy for other to quote you. P.S., Take a look at the top of this blog post to see what I mean 😉

6. Monitor and Protect. Finally, get Google Alerts on your best, most frequently used quotations. Find out who’s talking about you, quoting you, and, possibly, who’s stealing your material. Consider buying URL’s, registering trademarks and taking other legal actions to officially protect and copyright your intellectual property. (IF someone DOES steal your material, relax and read this.)

– – –

Now, I know that initially, it might feel odd quoting yourself.

But let’s face it: Ben Franklin, William James, Shakespeare, Emerson and Mark Twain have been quoted enough. The world needs some fresh material.

It’s time for YOU to become the next great thinker.

So, just remember:

If you quote yourself, other people will quote you.

If other people quote you, your perception as an expert and a thought leader will grow.

If your perception as an expert and thought leader grows, you will become more attractive, more approachable and more desirable.

And THAT will galvanize more customers, more opportunities and more business.

REMEMBER: ideas are your major source of income.

If you don’t quote yourself, nobody else will.

And you can quote me on that.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What do you “always say”?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share your best personal quotation here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

…only 19 more days until NametagTV.com goes ON AIR!

Study ordinary things intently

All creativity begins with curiosity.

About how things work.
About how things could work BETTER.
About why things are the way they are.
About why people do things they way they do.

But don’t MY word for it. Let’s hear what three of the world’s most notable creativity gurus had to say about the value of curiosity…

1. Leonardo Davinci. He called it curiosita, defined as, “An insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning.”

“The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding,” Davinci remarked. “Therefore, be always curious and observant.”

2. Edward DeBono. He encourages people to embrace curiosity by constantly saying, “Now that’s interesting…”

“Be able to find interest in almost anything,” DeBono says in How to Have a Beautiful Mind. “Be curious. Explore things. Bring up a discussion. Get people’s opinions, ideas and values. Explore, elaborate and make connections.”

3. Mihály Csíkszentmihályi. He reminds us to fascinate ourselves with the ordinary.

“Evaluate critically every novelty you encounter,” he wrote in his book Creativity. “One of the surest ways to enrich life is to make experiences less fleeting.”

LESSON LEARNED: study ordinary things intently.

When you can learn to do this – every single day – three things will happen:

You will BOOST your creativity.
You will FLOOD your mind with new ideas.
You will BUILD a solid foundation of curiosity.

And the combination of those three results will mold your melon into an attractive, valuable commodity that your clients will want to access to.

See, clients don’t want to hire consultants or marketers or coaches – they want to hire cool, smart people who happen to do those things.

So, if you want to use curiosity to attract more ideas (and more clients!), follow this four-step game plan:

1. NOTICE. On a daily basis, take the time to stop what you’re doing and say things like, “Huh. That’s weird,” or “Now that’s interesting…”

2. EXPLORE. Study ordinary things intently. Then, start a dialogue. Ask other people questions like, “So, why do you think she said that?” “Hey, did you guys notice that?” and “It would be interesting to see if…”

3. RECORD. Remember, if you don’t write it down, it never happened! So, consider keeping a Curiosity Journal. Make daily entries about things you noticed and what you learned from them.

4. EXPAND. Continue to learn, ask and research these new ideas you’re curious about. Constantly run them through your personal filter of expertise by asking, “How does this fit into my picture of the universe?”

With these four steps, your curiosity will become a weapon!

Both for you AND the customers you serve.

Now … isn’t that interesting?

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What ordinary thing have you recently studied intently?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Share your observations here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag

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How far do your thoughts travel?

Edward DeBono once said, “The measure of a great thinker is how far his thoughts travel.”

I call this “Idea Reach.”

And if you’re a creative professional, thought leader or entrepreneur, know this:

The farther your ideas go, the more your business will grow.

Now, if you want to figure out how far YOUR thoughts travel, the first thing you’ve got to do is take stock. Consider these self-assessment questions:

1. How many subscribers do you have?
2. What different countries do your website hits come from?
3. When was the last time you got an email from a complete stranger across the world that read something you wrote?
4. When was the last time you did an interview on a radio station outside of your hometown?
5. When was the last time you were recognized in a city outside of your hometown?
6. When was the last time your work was published in a widely circulated print publication?
7. When was the last time you were pinged on a blog you never heard of until your Google Alerts told you?
8. When was the last time you got an instant message from someone in China?
9. How often are you receiving unsolicited leads or fan mail from customers outside of your typical industry?
10. When was the last time you met someone who said, “Yeah, I’ve heard of you before…”

These questions should give you a solid primer for your Idea Reach.

Still, there’s one more secret…

You must MONITOR how far your thoughts travel.

Here are two suggestions for doing so:

1. Use The Google. Do regular keyword searches on your name, company name, website, philosophies and product titles. Find out who’s talking about you. Also, sign up for Google Alerts immediately. If you don’t know what that is, just Google it.

2. Keep Record. Create a WOM journal that tracks every single time you were talked about online. You might also keep a separate journal chronicling emails, instant messages, phone calls and personal encounters that tell you how far your thoughts travel.

By combing these questions and measuring tools, you’ll develop a better understanding of your Idea Reach.

REMEMBER: anonymity is your greatest barrier to business success.

The farther your ideas go, the more your business will grow.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How far do your ideas travel?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS…
Start your Idea Reach Journal Today. Email scott@hellomynameisscott.com with your best Idea Reach experience!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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