We are so glad that this is enough for us

Although cakes have been around for thousands of years, the first recipe for confectionery icing was originally published in a cookbook in the late seventeen hundreds. 

It was from that point on that cakes became a much more enjoyable food, thanks to the addition of this new fancy, sugary topping. 

Hence the phrase, icing on the cake. An attractive but inessential enhancement. The unexpected and additional benefit to something already good. 

What’s interesting is, those four words actually have a profound implication on the level of fulfillment in our lives, not just in our belly. 

It’s simply a matter of expectation. People who have reached a place of enduring contentment with themselves, those who have given up a perfectionist standard of what life should be, those who have deleted the word should from their internal narratives, they view the majority of life’s experiences as icing. Attractive enhancements. Additional benefits to something already good. 

Nice work if you can get it, but it’s not a must. Or a demand. There’s no pouting or disappointment if it doesn’t happen. The cake is what matters. The cake is what we can control. 

On the other hand, the people who tyrannize themselves through the anxiety of comparison, those who are trapped in the battle of enoughness, those who are never quite at peace with the path they take, they live only for the icing. The cake is simply a means to a sugary end. And if they don’t get what they expect, all hell breaks loose. 

Which attitude describes you? Can you achieve genuine satisfaction from the cake alone, or do you always need the icing to be happy? 

If it’s true that there is a direct proportion between our level of expectation and the amount of stress we experience, then perhaps our goal is to shift our mindset so that the cake is enough for us. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS…

Are you missing out on your life by comparing it to an unrealistic standard?* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

What if we knew that nothing was missing right now?

If our strategy is to wait until our burdens diminish, when we are no longer constrained by obligation, when we are finally free enough to do what we really want to do, then we are going to be waiting a very long time. 



Because there is no set of auspicious circumstances on the horizon that will make us whole. There is no magical day in the future when our success will be enough for us. 



Because nothing is ever enough. For anybody. 



And so, there is a decision we have to make for ourselves. That who we are right now is okay. 



Altman’s brilliant book on mindfulness said it best:



When we walk without grasping for anything else, we can touch peace and contentment. We can fully embrace each step, craving nothing else, knowing the world has nothing more precious to offer right now. 

Without that sense of presence, there will always be some goddamn thing that just barely outruns us each day. Fulfillment will always feel like a distant smudge on the horizon. 

Our mission, then, is to become secure enough in our own inner structure. To accept that there is nothing to wait for, except the changing of our own consciousness. And to trust that nothing is missing for us in this moment. 

From that place, we can stand firmly grounded in what’s available and possible, right now. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS…

Do you still believe that your happiness depends on something in the future?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Your brilliance will not save you

In the modern business world, safety, security and stability are illusions. 

At any moment, we can all be disposed of. Straight up railroaded. Rug pulled out from under us. 

These things just happen. Anybody can get canned. There is no immunity. There is no potent vaccine of personal specialness, hard work, positive attitude and corporate politicking that will inoculate us against the cruel bite of commercialism. 

Even our brilliance will not save us. 

Carlin said it best in his legendary comedy routine: 

The game is rigged. It’s a big club, and you ain’t in it. 

That’s business. 

However, this is no reason to become cynical, paranoid or apathetic. 

Quite the opposite, in fact. Running up against the reality of impermanence in business is actually quite liberating. Because it gives us permission to empty our expectations, not depend on external sources of worthiness or reassurance, and just crack on with the project of making meaning in the world. 

Once we accept that we’re already naked, once we surrender to this lack of control, once we learn to trust the uncertainty of the process, and once we laugh at the absurdity of even having to go to work in the first place, then will be free. 

Because we will have built a sacred spaciousness inside of ourselves that nobody can touch. Something that we can take with us wherever we go. 

It reminds me of an interview with a famous sitcom showrunner. After three decades in the television business, his advice to young writers was this:

You may as well do the show you want to do, because in the end, they’re just going to cancel it anyway. 



LET ME ASK YA THIS…

How will you liberate the tremendous untapped resource of energy within yourself? 

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Every day your mind can be set in the right direction

Doctors tell us that we should exercise moderately for about thirty minutes a day. 

Pretty standard health advice. 

The only thing, our mind is actually the asset that must be worked on most and understood best. But there doesn’t seem to be a minimum daily requirement for mental exertion. 

And there should be. Especially when it comes to noticing and managing our more damaging thoughts. 

Emmett’s daily devotional was among the first books in the positive psychology revolution to explore how thoughts can shape our reality. One passage in particular comes to mind. 

Every time you dig up an old grievance or an old mistake by rehearsing it in your mind or, still worse, by telling someone else about it, you are simply ripping open a grave. Life is too precious for grave robbing. Let corpses alone. The past is past, liquidate it. If a negative memory comes into your mind, cremate it with the right thought and forget it. 

And so, instead of reflexively tumbling down the toxic rabbit hole of cynicism, we become aware of when our mind is being controlled by unpleasant feelings. 

Instead of allowing our mind to churn out thoughts veined with worry, we catch a negative seed being planted in our mind and gently uproot it. 

Proving to ourselves that we can still listen to our mind without taking it seriously. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS…

What if you made a law for yourself today that you are not going to touch any mentally negative thing? 

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Recognizing reality and becoming comfortable with it

Manhattan pizza is not good because it doesn’t have to be. 

There are eight million angry, hungry, sweaty people in this city, and the majority of them are running late to something. 

Pizza is convenient, tasty, cheap and full of energy. And so, from an economics perspective, the shops have no real incentive to make amazing food. Because their demand is inelastic. Their audience is built in. 

Why would any business owner spend any extra time or money improving the quality of a product that millions of people are guaranteed to buy on price and convenience anyway, and forget about twenty minutes later? 

Pizza is like a cat. It doesn’t really care if you live or die, it just likes playing with you until it happens. 

Keep in mind, though, this isn’t an indictment of big city pizza joints. They’re just trying to make money and keep the lights on like every other business.

The lesson is about consumers understanding the context in which they are consuming. Having deeper empathy for the business reality of the world. Emptying their expectations about the transactional marketplace in which we live. 

Sometimes it’s less about the customer being right, and more about the customer being right there. 



LET ME ASK YA THIS…

Are you ready to relieve yourself of the burden of trying to make outcomes match your expectations?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

We have seen the moment of your greatness flickering

The startup landscape is littered with the
carcasses of young, enthusiastic, creative entrepreneurs, buried beneath the
ashes of brave ideas, failed dreams and misguided expectations. 

My question is,
when did we decide that was a bad thing? 

At least those people took a risk. At
least they had the guts to follow their dream, put it all on the line, live on
an unpaved road and hope to find some beauty at the end. 

Truth is, the fact
that they didn’t make it out alive is a moot point. Because the world hasn’t
seen the last of them. People like that are masters at learning fast, growing
stronger and bouncing back with new skills to redirect their energies into
something else. 

It’s only a matter of time before something they do sticks. 

That’s how greatness works. It’s platform agnostic. Team, position, hometown
and league are irrelevant. If you’re great, you can be great anywhere. 

And
forget about following your passion. Great people let their passion follow
them. 

Allowing it to set up shop anywhere it needs to, making itself at home
wherever they go. It’s like a universal power adapter with twin voltage
converters that can channel electricity in whatever outlet is available. 

Here’s
an interesting illustration from out left field: Arabian horses. 

Valentino was
a champion yearling colt from about fifteen years ago. Even at the ripe age of
two, bookings for future breeding started pouring in from around the world.
Hundreds of them. Because horse owners knew that greatness was in his blood. 

Sure enough, once he began siring his offspring, each of those horses became
great in their own right. Some became work horses, others became show horses,
while others became race horses. 

But they were all great. Because of their conformation,
how they were built, the way they moved, those beauties would have been great
at whatever they did. They were the kinds of animals who could have done
whatever needed to be done. 

The point is, trust your greatness. Be patient with
it. When you see the moments of it flickering, don’t be in such a hurry to
power the entire world. 

Sometimes it takes a while before the charge catches
on. 

Just have faith that you take yourself with you everywhere you go. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS…

And it’s only a matter of time. Are you slowly orienting yourself to a sustaining source of power?
* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

On the verge of happiness only to have it stolen away from you

Camille reminds us in her book about envy that the ego is a fragile little demon that gorges itself on our eternal discontent. It sulks like a toddler when it doesn’t get its way. 

Personally, that sounds exactly like most of the battles inside my head. Tell me if this sounds familiar. 

Your ego cunningly tricks you into believing that happiness can be found in some other way. At some magical destination to be reached where you will finally be happily ever after. Just when you think you finally have everything you want you to be content, your ego steps in and says:

Oh really? Did you see that guy’s backpack? It’s much nicer than the one you have at home. Wait, isn’t that a bungee cord on the front panel for easy access? With two mesh side stretch pockets for easy water bottle storage? It’s probably not even that expensive. Why not treat yourself? You deserve it. Besides, your old backpack is almost a year old now. That’s like a lifetime in backpack years. Dude, this new bag is going to change everything for you. Things are going to be different from now on. And since same day shipping is free now, you can always return the bag for a refund before your wife even sees the delivery box. 

Indeed, our egos are working overtime to keep themselves entrenched. 

Despite the fact that more than a billion people on earth have never once gone shopping, our egos love to instill the overwhelming sense of urgency that we are just one purchase away from happiness. 

We must be willing to look beyond this illusion. 

Not to eliminate the ego, of course, but to notice and name it, see it for the bullshit that it is, and hope it goes away. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS…

What’s the last impulsive purchase you kept a secret from someone because of guilt? * * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Happiness isn’t good enough, we demand euphoria

Nobody has complete integrity all of the time. 

Life is messy, complicated and unpredictable. No matter how honorable and authentic we purport to be, the reality is, everyone does what they have to do to survive and be happy. 

We all work out our own brand of compromise. We all find compartments to put things in that make them okay. 

Sometimes we even sell our soul if times are tough and the price is right. 

A friend of mine in his sixties once made a poignant observation. He said:

It doesn’t matter if you choose the future that’s cheaper, it only matters if it’s the one you want. 

His insight helped me realize something. There is no such thing as settling. That’s just a word people use when life doesn’t match their fantasy. 

But that’s the danger in viewing our cement stance as some kind of mark of heroism. We’re so busy congratulating ourselves on our flawless integrity that we actually miss out on many of the unexpected opportunities that would have come our way had our hearts been more malleable. 

Besides, the word settling comes from the root sahtlenm, which simply means, to content oneself. 

When did we decide that wasn’t enough? When did euphoria become the price of admission for a fulfilling life? 

If we ever want to reach that place of enduring contentment with ourselves, we must let go of the need to have things work out our way all the time. 

Because without that ability to trust that which is good enough, life becomes an asymptotic death march to an impossible to reach marshmallow fantasyland. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS…

How has your definition of personal integrity evolved?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Open to everything, attached to nothing

Being picky isn’t the problem, it’s the symptom. 

The problem is, we have expectations. The problem is, we are afraid of taking risks, being wrong, looking foolish and getting hurt. The problem is, we are addicted to the identity of a person of heroic integrity who holds impossibly high standards for themselves and others. The problem is, we romanticize the fairytale of finding the ideal partner or the perfect job that’s going to change everything and complete our life and make us whole. 

Perhaps our pickiness is a sign that some letting go may be in order. 

Perhaps maintaining this posture in a contracted state of fear so we’re never taken by surprise is no longer serving our goals. 

A mentor of mine once told me that being religious about how you make your money is the quickest way to go out of business. That was a powerful insight for me as an entrepreneur, but also for my life as a whole. 

It challenged me to avail myself of every opportunity to create value for others, even if it was out of my comfort zone. It invited me to move in direction of being more open to all kinds of new relationships, even if they didn’t satisfy all seventeen of the bullet points on my list of desirable human attributes. 

Look, each of us remakes ourselves as we grow and as the world changes. Each of us evolves our criteria for what we find attractive and meaningful as we evolve ourselves. And so, we say yes to life, even though we know it will devour us. 

Because those yeses, imperfect and scary as they may be, are our currency for fulfillment. They’re like helium. And they will translate into positives, if we only let them. 

Being picky, it tends to makes our lives smaller and heavier. 



LET ME ASK YA THIS…

Are your expectations serving or frustrating you? 

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Fertilizing the bad fruit hoping for a good harvest

People love bragging to themselves and others about how they’re really doing the work. 

It just sounds so ambitious and blue collar and honest. Doing the work. 

The only problem with that phrase is, it presupposes that people have a productive definition of what work is. 

Because if their initial assumption is flawed, then any subsequent ambition is wasted. 

Like the person who has been unemployed for two years, but spends thirty hours a week on dating websites and having coffee with strangers, trying to find the perfect boyfriend. 

She very well may be doing the work. But it sounds more like stalling maneuver. Sounds like a person who is artfully creating constant distraction by piling on comfortable, arbitrary work that helps her avoid doing what matters most right now. 

Covey famously pointed this out in the bestselling business book in history:

If the ladder is not leaning against the right wall, then every step we take just gets us to the wrong place faster. 

Does that describe you or someone you know? Inventing spectacular ways to avoid doing the real work? 

If it does, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, merely aware of. Because once you accept that you’ve been putting off action to a day that never arrives, perhaps it will motivate you to redefine what doing the work really means.



LET ME ASK YA THIS…

How will you break free of the mesmerizing forces that want you to avoid looking reality in the eye?



* * * *

Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag

Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  

scott@hellomynameisscott.com

www.nametagscott.com

It’s the world’s first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!


Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.

Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Sign up for daily updates
Connect

Subscribe

Daily updates straight to your inbox.

Copyright ©2020 HELLO, my name is Blog!